Petra Collins (23) is an artist and curator living in NYC. Shooting since the age of 15, her images are fueled by self-discovery and contemporary femininity which explore the complex intersection of life as a young woman online and off. Collins’s images offer an unflinching honesty, exploring the privacies and publicities of growing up as a woman at a moment when female bodies are ubiquitously hyper-mediated by Photoshop and social media. Collins has also curated a handful of shows: Gynolandscape and  Pussy Pat, New York City, NY; Strange Magic, Los Angeles, CA; Literally Bye, Art Basel, Miami, FL; and Comforter, SFAQ [Project] Space, San Francisco, CA. She has also given lectures at educational and art institutions such as York University and The Art Gallery of Ontario. Her work has been featured in publications including I.D., Dazed & Confused, NY Magazine, The New York TimesTeen VogueL’Uomo VogueVogue ME China, ElleGlamourJalouseVanity FairPurple, Interview, Vice and more. In 2015 she released a short film series called Making Space about teen dancers, and curated a book called Babe published by Random House. A forthcoming book on Collins’ work will be published this fall by Phaidon.

 

Ever Gold [Projects] Exhibitions:

Forthcoming: Solo Exhibition, September 9th – October 21st, 2017

24 Hour Psycho, April 2016

Comforter, Curated by Petra Collins, March 2015

 

Petra Collins Untitled #5 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

Petra Collins
Untitled #5 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

 

Petra Collins Untitled #19 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

Petra Collins
Untitled #19 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

 

Petra Collins Untitled #4 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

Petra Collins
Untitled #4 (24 Hour Psycho) Digital C-print. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

 

 

Petra Collins
“Anna and Kathleen (rainbow)”, 2016. Digital Archival Photograph. 65 x 43 inches. Edition of 2.

 

Petra Collins
“Bundle”, 2016
Archival digital photograph
65 x 43 inches
Edition of 2

 

Selfie (Aly), 2014. Digital archival photograph. 30×45 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Jacqueline (Macbook), 2014. Digital archival photograph. 30×45 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Petra Collins, “Feeling it”, 2014. Neon. 35×35 inches. Edition of 2.

 

Petra Collins, “Giddy up…Giddy up”
2014. Neon.
40 inches wide.
Edition of 2

 

Petra Collins
“Wish You Weren’t here”, 2014. Neon.
40 inches wide.
Edition of 2

 

 

 


Selected Press:

The New Yorker, October, 2016

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Artforum, Summer issue 2016. 

I THINK ADVERTISING is actually a lot more open than it used to be. The artists involved have more creative freedom because the consumer is looking for something new—a new kind of authenticity.

I’m in a good position where I can do commissions that pay my bills; advertorial or fashion jobs allow me to go off and do my “art” pho- tography, but they have also creatively informed my other work, which focuses on portraits of girls and women. And I enjoy doing it; I’m lucky that I’m often able to cast my own people or choose my own lighting for commercial projects. I cast a Calvin Klein and Opening Ceremony shoot for Elle last year, which allowed me to put images of body types and skin colors that aren’t usually represented into the implied public sphere.

The art world is still very archaic, holding on to this notion that you can’t be an artist and do other work “outside.” Most people don’t make it to a gallery or aren’t able to access art books. But they still see images everywhere. You need artists to create ads and to en- gage this larger media landscape: They can push and change the entire field of images. We live in an increasingly consumption-based and image-heavy world. I don’t think that’s something that we can or should fight, but we should try to integrate different narratives and ideas. Commercials are public art.

In my teens, I was creating a lot of photos, but I never found a place to display them. I decided to make a website as a platform for myself and other female artists to share their work. Then I joined Instagram and Tumblr. The format of social media is very specific because of the cropping and scale, which changes drastically from screen to screen, device to device. An Instagram page is like a gallery. When you scroll through, either the images work together or they don’t.

When I was in art school, we were taught that you have to wait to be accepted into a gallery. You’re always waiting for permission. But sometimes it never comes, depending on who you are. Right now so many people who never had a voice are able to connect and build networks. Especially with Instagram, social-media platforms allow girls, women, and minorities to control the circulation of their work and to create their own pictures of themselves.
—As told to Isabel Flower

Petra Collins is an artist and curator living in New York.

 

 

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Artsy, 30 Emerging Artists To Watch This Spring

At 23 years old, rising star Collins has amassed a tremendous and loyalfollowing (she’s been taking photographs since age 15) for her dreamy, pastel-hued explorations of female identity. An artist as well as a curator, actor, filmmaker, and model, the ubiquitous Collins is fostering a generation of self-empowered young women, evidenced by her 2015 book,Babe, the fruit of the girls-only art collective The Ardorous, which she founded during high school. Though best known for her editorial work (think Vogue, Interview, i-D) this month Collins fills Ever Gold Gallery with large-scale portraits of women crying—all shot collaboratively between the artist and her vulnerable-yet-brazen, brilliantly lit subjects. Last week, Collins debuted a music video for Carly Rae Jepsen onROOKIE magazine (where she was one of the earliest contributors).

 

 


 

 

SELECTED SOLO, GROUP, AND CURATED EXHIBITIONS

2017

Art Los Angeles Contemporary, Los Angeles, two person booth with Petra Cortright, Ever Gold [Projects]

A Magazine, solo exhibition curated by Alessandro Michele (Gucci designer), Hong Kong

Pacifier, featured solo exhibition of Contact Photography Festival, Toronto

Upcoming solo exhibition with Ever Gold [Projects], September 2017

 

2016

Cause the Grass Don’t Grow and The Sky Ain’t Blue, Praz-Delavallade, Paris

The Female Gaze, BASE Milano, Milan

The Collective, Uncontaminated Art Festival, Oslo

24 Hour Psycho (solo exhibition), Ever Gold, San Francisco, CA

Sans Titre, 45, Quai de la Tournelle, Paris

 

2015

Comforter, curated by Petra Collins, SFAQ [Project] Space, San Francisco, CA

fuckboifuneral, curated by Petra Collins and Madelyne Beckles, The Standard Miami, Art Basel Miami Beach

 

2014

Pussy Pat, curated by Petra Collins, Mud Guts, Brooklyn, NY

Discharge (solo exhibition), Capricious 88, New York, NY

It’s an Invasion, The National Arts Club, New York, NY

Literally Bye, curated by Petra Collins, The Standard Miami, Art Basel Miami Beach

 

2013

Gynolandscape, curated by Petra Collins, FOUR81, New York, NY

No Class, Ansomnia Creative House, Art Basel Miami Beach